Tag Archives: Pressure

10 Ways to Naturally Lower Blood Pressure & Reduce Cholesterol

1. MANAGE STRESS: Although stress is a normal phenomenon of the human experience, it is how we control stress. Stress and anxiety produce chemicals to be released into your body, increase your blood pressure and trigger a reduction of blood flow to your heart. Most people in Stage 1 or 2 of adrenal fatigue typically have high blood pressure secondary to increased cortisol and adrenaline. Those with hypertension should always eliminate  heavy metal toxicity. LDL cholesterol levels may be resulted from excessive stress too.

 

Winning Formulas to Relax and Manage Stress (practice some form of stress reduction EVERY day):

 

– Prioritize – write down your priorities

– Breathe – Full, deep belly breathing. Start with a minimum of two minutes every day and gradually increase to ten minutes daily.

– Yoga

– Meditation

– Massage

– Listen to calm music

– Warm, aromatherapy bath with Epsom salts

– Change how you view situations

– Surround yourself with like-minded people and friends. You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with. Be aware and eliminate unhealthy, stressful social behaviors including arguments, drama, drinking, inactivity, unhealthy eating and over-eating.

 

University of Utah psychologist found that women in strained marriages are more likely to feel depressed and suffer high blood pressure, obesity and other signs of “metabolic syndrome,” a group of risk factors for heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

– Dissolve unhealthy lose-win relationships and focus on attracting only win-win relationships.

 

2. ELIMINATE ALL PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED OILS (TRANS FATS): Partially hydrogenated oils are found in thousands of processed foods (breakfast cereals, cookies, chips, fried foods, packaged foods, all CRAP food). Trans fats are proven to cause heart disease. Restaurant food, especially from fast food chains, often serve food loaded with trans fats.

 

Consequences of a diet high in trans fats include:

 

– inflammation

– immune function

– testosterone

– Arthritis

– Cancer

– Decrease IQ – learning disabilities. American IQ has dropped 20 points in the past 20 years.

– Diabetes

– Elevated blood pressure

– Free radical production

– Heart Disease

– Interferes with neurological & visual development of fetus

– Liver damage

– Obesity

– Osteoporosis

– Type II diabetes

 

3. LOSE BODY FAT: This is achieved with the “4 Powers” – Nutrition, Lifestyle, Exercise and Supplements. Excess body fat stresses your joints and organs, including your heart. Decreasing body fat in a healthy, slow, steady manner will improve your health, lower your cholesterol and reduce blood pressure and your risk of diabetes.

 

4. CONSISTENT EXERCISE: This isn’t breaking news. Exercise will help you reduce stress, decrease body fat, increase your metabolism and lower your risk of diabetes. Adequate, consistent exercise will lower your blood pressure and increase the “good” HDL cholesterol and lower your triglycerides. Take a brisk 30 minute walk every day. There is evidence that resistance training results in a more favorable balance in myocardial oxygen supply and demand than aerobic exercise due to the lower heart rate and higher myocardial perfusion pressure. Moderate intensity strength training can control or prevent hypertension. Circulation 116: 572-584, 2007.

 

5. ELIMINATE HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP: HFCS is the number one source of calories for most Americans and causes obesity. You’ll find high-fructose corn syrup in processed crap food, sodas, syrup that goes into your Latte from Starbucks, etc. HFCS is extremely toxic to your liver, increases inflammation, oxidative stress and creates an aggressive insulin response.

 

6. SUPPLEMENTS FOR HYPERTENSION: Omega-3 fish oils, magnesium, vitamin D, Biotics VasculoSirt, Green Tea Extract, Hawthorne Extract, Digestive enzymes, Probiotics, Folic Acid, Ginger

– Ginger has blood pressure-lowering effects that can protect against the chronic brain injury caused by hypertension. Vascul Pharmacol, 2005 Oct;43(4):234-41

– Supplementation with at least 5000 microg/d folic acid for at least 6 weeks may reduce systolic blood pressure slightly. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, 2009; 8(1): 15-24.

– Diuretics cause potassium levels to drop increasing the risk of hypokalemia.

– Beta-blockers reduce heart rate and cardiac output potentially reducing exercise performance.

– With calcium channel blockers systolic and diastolic blood pressures are reduced during exercise which may result in light headedness and peripheral edema post-exercise.

– Additional side effects from hypertension drugs include: dizziness, increased risk of breast cancer, memory loss, nausea, asthma-like symptoms, joint pain and impotence in men.

 

SUPPLEMENTS FOR ELEVATED CHOLESTEROL: Omega-3 fish oils, tocotrienols, pantethine, vitamin D, Biotics VasculoSirt or GlucoBalance, Green Tea Extract

 

According to a recent study, men with higher vitamin D levels had a 59% reduction in heart attacks. So if vitamin D’s only benefit was to reduce coronary heart attack rates by 59%, the net savings (after deducting the cost of the vitamin D) if every American supplemented properly would be around $ 85 billion each year. Arch Intern Med. 2008 Jun 9; 168(11):1174-80

 

7. FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE increase potassium rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, legumes and fish. Most Americans consume only half the recommended daily intake of potassium and twice the suggested limit for sodium! Potassium can influence BP levels by increasing sodium excretion from the body by stimulating the blood vessels to dilate, opening potassium channels.

 

FOR ELEVATED CHOLESTEROL increase consumption of plant sterols, sometimes called phytosterols. Plant sterols are the healthy compounds that occur naturally in a variety of plant foods such as fruits and vegetables, seeds and nuts. These foods are recognized for their proven role in lowering LDL “bad” cholesterol levels.

 

FOR BOTH, ELEVATED CHOLESTEROL and HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE include beta-glucan for fiber, a natural occurring soluble fiber found in whole-grain, oat based cereals. Beta-glucan has LDL cholesterol lowering benefits and substantial decreases in blood pressure.

 

8. INCREASE CONSUMPTION OF SMART FATS and ORGANIC PROTEIN:
FATS – avocado, wild fish, raw (unsalted) organic nuts and seeds, coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil

PROTEINS – Grass-fed beef and buffalo, cage-free poultry, wild salmon, fish, eggs, quality whey protein isolate or concentrate.

 

9. DECREASE ALCOHOL and CAFFEINE CONSUMPTION and INCREASE WATER INTAKE: Alcohol and caffeine cause adrenaline rushes that make blood pressure soar. Alcohol, sugar and processed, refined grains also lead to insulin resistance, hypertension and elevated cholesterol. Alcohol can affect your nerves and how your liver processes fat in the blood. Alcohol and caffeine disrupt blood glucose levels. Not only is alcohol hard on the body, just one drink can cause cellular death in several organs such as the brain.

 

Take your bodyweight and multiply by .7 – this will give you the number of ounces you should be drinking daily. Add a pinch of Celtic sea salt and lemon to your water.

 

10. ELIMINATE SUGAR, REFINED CARBOHYDRATES and ALL ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS: Phenylalanine, especially found in Nutra-Sweet and OTC antihistamines, can aggravate high blood pressure.

 

Sugar is more addictive than cocaine! Sugar has a profound influence on your brain function and your psychological function. When you consume excess amounts of sugar, your body releases excess amounts of insulin, which in turn causes a drop in your blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia. Sugar and refined carbohydrates wreak havoc on blood glucose levels.

 

In addition, sugar is pro-flammatory and damages skin collagen and promotes again and wrinkles, increases your appetite, depletes your body of B vitamins, causes joint degeneration, ADHD and other behavior disorders, stimulates cholesterol synthesis and weight gain. This is just a small list of sugars’ toxic side effects.

 

Hypertension and elevated cholesterol (as well as diabetes) can be managed WITHOUT pharmaceutical drugs. HOW? Healthy lifestyle habits, stress management, supplements, diet and nutrition, a proper exercise program and fat loss.

 

Copyright © 2009 Paula Owens

 

PAULA OWENS
Author of THE POWER OF 4
Master of Holistic Nutrition
Fitness Expert/Coach
http://www.PaulaOwens.com

Naturally Reduce Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure: Blood is naturally under pressure as the heart forces it around the circulation, with hypertension the pressure is above the normal limits. There may be no symptoms with hypertension at first but over time can increase risk of disorders such as stroke, heart disease and kidney failure. High blood pressure cannot be cured but it can be reduced and controlled, often a change in diet and lifestyle may be all that is necessary to reduce blood pressure. Currently 50 million Americans have hypertension, approximately 20% of the population.

Factors of Hypertension: There are no obvious causes for hypertension, however factors that can increase the risk are.

* Sedentary Lifestyle – Increases risk of cardiovascular disease (60% of Americans do not get enough exercise).

* Genetic Factors – There are gene variants associated with increased risk of hypertension.

* Family history – Having a parent or close relative with hypertension increases your risk.

* Ethnicity – hypertension tends to affect African Americans with greater frequency.

* Obesity – Being overweight increases risk of heart disease, hypertension, and stroke.

* Alcohol – Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol can increase your risk. (More than 1 drink per day for women and 2 per day for men).

* Smoking – A major factor for developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

* High salt diet

* Age – The risk of hypertension increases with age, men tend to develop between the ages of 35 and 55, and women after menopause

Naturally Reduce Blood Pressure with Pycnogenol:

Study 1: Researchers including Dr. David Fitzpatrick of the University of South Florida and Dr. Lester Packer of the University of California, Berkley have conducted research on pycnogenol and nitric oxide, and how it naturally optimizes the levels of nitric oxide production in the blood vessels to facilitate blood flow and reduce blood pressure. It naturally helps the body produce adequate levels of nitric oxide for necessary functions, and can also reduce the levels of nitric oxide where it does harm. Pycnogenol has a mild hypotensive effect that helps prevent or reduce hypertension naturally. (Fitzpatrick et al., 1998)

Study 2: Dr Miklos and his colleagues at the Albert Szent-Gyorgyi Medical University in Szeged, Hungry and Dr. Peter Rohdewald of the University of Muenster, Germany In their study published in 1996 in the Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Letters, described the hypotensive effect of pycnogenol as “moderate”. Pycnogenol naturally helps the heart by blocking some action of the angio-tensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in causing hypertension. People with lower or normal blood pressure will not be affected and those with hypertension and too much ACE will benefit

Naturally Reduce Blood Pressure with Grape Seed Extract: Scientist for the University of California, Davis did a 4 week study on 24 patients. One group was given a placebo treatment, a second group was given 150mg of grape seed extract, and a third group was given 300mg of grape seed extract. At the end of the four week study blood pressure was reduced in all patients taking the grape seed extract, blood pressure did not change in the placebo group. On average Systolic blood pressure dropped 12 points, and the diastolic dropped 8 points. Both doses were equally efficient in naturally reducing the blood pressure. (American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition, Atlanta, March 26-30, 2006)

Reduce side effects of antihypertensive medications:

Study 1: A study published in a 2006 issue of the Journal of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis shows that pycnogenol can naturally reduce edema by 36 percent, a common side effect of high blood pressure medications. The results of the study show pycnogenol naturally improves circulation, this avoids blood pooling and can reduce edema.

Study 2: In 2004 Dr. X. Liu confirmed that pycnogenol naturally improved the endothelial function of hypertensive patients and allowed those on antihypertensive drugs to reduce their dosage. (Life Science, 2004)

Best Source of Pycnogenol and Grape Seed Extract: A natural supplement Isotonix OPC-3 (Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins) is an isotonic-capable food supplement that is made from a combination of bilberry, grape seed extract, red wine, pine bark extracts and citrus extract bioflavonoids, all found to be potent antioxidants. Isotonix OPC-3 contains the only isotonic form of Pycnogenol in the world.

Richard Bonney is a Nutraceutical Consultant with NutraMetrix providing Advanced Nutraceuticals, Gene SNP DNA Analysis and Patient Wellness Education in Medical offices. For further information on Isotonix OPC-3 visit http://naturaltreatment.isotonix.com/

High Blood Pressure – Can Slow Breathing Lower Your Blood Pressure?

High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is a problem that affects a lot of people. Since hypertension seldom causes any symptoms in the beginning, many are unaware of that they even have a problem. But if nothing is done, the risk of serious health problems later in life increases dramatically.

The standard response to hypertension is medication. But for a lot of people, medication is not a good long term solution. Just relying on drugs, without changing your life style often means that your blood pressure starts rising again after some time. You get stronger medication which helps for a while but soon you are faced with an increasing blood pressure again.

For most people, trying natural remedies is a much better long term solution than medication. The most common methods are healthier food habits, more physical activity and relaxation exercises. But lately, a new way of lowering your blood pressure has become popular, slow breathing.

Research has shown that a daily 15 minute session with eight breaths per minute is an efficient way of lowering your blood pressure. Some people have got good results with less than ten breaths per minute as well. That said, you should not focus on counting your breaths, just try to breathe slowly and smoothly. For many it may take a couple of sessions to just get down to ten breaths per minute. But it is more important to keep the breathing natural, rather than trying to force the number of breaths down.

Although slow breathing has in many cases proved to be an efficient way of lowering your blood pressure, it is not a panacea. If your hypertension is caused by your life style, for example unhealthy food habits and no exercise, your best bet is to change your life style. The old rule applies; fix the cause, not the symptom.

Even though slow breathing is easy to do, it is still possible to make it wrong and not getting any positive result. Make sure that you breathe gently, trying to fill your lungs completely with air may lead to hyperventilation. This will instead raise your blood pressure. Also if you start to feel light-headed, you need to stop the exercise.

For more information what slow breathing can do for you, go to http://lowbloodpressurenaturally.info

Dealing With Low Blood Pressure While Pregnant

Some women are unfortunate enough to struggle with low blood pressure while they are pregnant-this can be a serious problem that you need to manage, for the health of your fetus. While pregnancy for most goes pretty smoothly and drama free, you never know if you are going to be one of the women who has some complications.

However, there is no need to worry. It is natural and part of pregnancy.

This issue of low blood pressure is also called hypotension. The blood pressure of pregnant women goes down in the first twenty four weeks, and then rises to normal eventually in final stage.

This problem is often connected with dizziness and fainting. While it is not a health risk like high blood pressure, fainting and falling because of hypotension can be a serious issue.

The biggest cause of this problem while you are expecting is dehydration. When the body dehydrates, it affects the low pressure in your vein.

Hot temperatures and standing for a long period of time can also be a risk factor contributing to this issue. Other factors that can cause this problem include blood pools in your legs, which make less blood available to the brain.

Thus, when you get up from a lying position, you may feel faint or dizzy. In addition, certain sexual hormones are released in a women’s body leading to the widening of blood vessels.

This heightens nausea, dizziness, cold, depression, and problems of vision. When the circulatory system expands to adjust itself to cater to the blood supply for the baby, it may lead to hypotension.

A history of certain diseases like those of heart or endocrine system can cause this problem as well. Pressure increases on the large blood vessels when the uterus enlarges, leading to issues.

Anemia and hypoglycemia can also cause hypotension while you are expecting. To know if this might be the problem you are having, you need to learn how to identify the signs and symptoms.

Once you know that you are going to have a baby, you must not take anything lightly. Issues like anemia and hypotension all are part of the next nine months for you.

Pay attention to feelings of dizziness or fainting, lightheadedness, nausea that will not go away, vomiting, depression, fatigue, blurred vision, and weakness. If you are feeling any of these things in your life, it is important that you tell your doctor right away.

They will be able to tell you if what you are feeling is normal, and may even want to do one of two tests. There are things that you can do to prevent this issue from happening all together.

To begin with, drink a lot of water and other fluids to avoid dehydration. Make sure you are getting at least eight to ten cups of water a day.

Do not allow yourself to become to hungry, and eat small meals often throughout the day. Lay on your side rather than your back.

This will also help with sciatic nerve and back pain. When you need to get up from a sitting or laying down position, be sure to get up slowly.

Sit or lie down if you feel faint, and put your head at a lower level than your body. Regularly exercise according to your physician-approved exercise regimen.

You may want to try walking on a treadmill, or riding a stationary bike. These are great ways to keep yourself fit, and building strength.

This may help you from having a problem which you will need to seek treatment for. Above all, make sure that you are getting enough sleep.

Go for regular check-ups and follow a regulated lifestyle. Generally, if you are having a problem in your first trimester, it will resolve itself in the second trimester.

If you can control it during the first few months, you will most likely not have to worry about it longer than that. If you do need help from a doctor, they will try to find out exactly where your issue is coming from.

If it is caused by dehydration, the doctor can treat it with intravenous fluids. If it is caused by blood pooling in legs, it can be treated with the help of graduated compression stockings.

Your doctor will most likely recommend a healthier diet, which you should be eating anyways. If you see your doctor regularly, you will be able to avoid this becoming a serious problem for you and your baby.

Tommy Greene is a personal trainer and has authored hundreds of articles relating to physical training and exercise bikes. He has been a health expert and physical trainer for over 15 years.

Contact Info:
Tommy Greene
TommyGreene09@gmail.com
http://www.nordictrack.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Category2_-1_10301_12401_19551_Y

4 Ways Guided Breathing Controls Blood Pressure Naturally

So, how could something as simple as breathing control blood pressure?

1) One theory is that it’s actually not so much about relaxation and has more to do with helping the body get salt out. When people are under stress, they tend to take shallow breaths. This “inhibitory breathing” in turn, makes the blood more acidic and makes the kidneys less efficient at removing sodium from the blood.

In research conducted by Dr. David Anderson of the National Institute of Health, inhibitory breathing was linked to elevated salt and higher blood pressure.

“If you sit there under-breathing all day, as most people do, and you have high salt intake, your kidneys may be less effective at getting rid of salt,” said Anderson.

When people do slow, deep breathing, “They may be changing their blood gases and the way their kidneys are regulating salt,” Anderson says.

2) Another theory is that Guided Breathing increases nitric oxide transmission in our blood. “Nitric oxide is a substance that helps keep our blood vessels open,” says Dr. Elijah Saunders, head of hypertension research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Cardiology Department.

The endothelium cells (the cells that line our blood vessels) use nitric oxide to tell the muscles that surround them to relax. This process is known as “vasodilation” and results in increased blood flow.

In research conducted by Dr. Nick Vaziri, of the UC Irvine College of Medicine, high blood pressure was linked with impaired nitric oxide pathways. It appears that Guided Breathing may help keep our bodies’ nitric oxide levels in better balance – allowing our blood vessels to relax naturally.

3) A third theory is that slow, deep breathing helps us oxygenate. Our brains are only 2% of our body weight yet they consume 20% of the oxygen we inhale.

“Slight changes in oxygen content in the brain can alter the way a person feels and behaves,” says Dr. Daniel G. Amen, author of Change Your Brain, Change Your Life.

The shallow breaths associated with stress and negative emotions don’t allow us to get enough oxygen. “The oxygen content in the stressed person’s blood is lowered,” says Dr. Amen, leading to more stress in a downward spiral.

The answer is to break the cycle by recognizing when our shallow breathing isn’t serving our best interests. Slow, deep breathing gives our body the oxygen it needs and signals the body to get things back in balance.

4) The fourth theory centers around a concept known as “entrainment.” This is the tendency of the brain to mimic a stimulus. For example, when you hear slow, mellow Jazz, the electrical currents in your brain will get calm too. It’s thought that through slow, deep breathing, your brain takes a cue to break the stress cycle.

The fascinating thing is that the break in the stress cycle isn’t just temporary. After a few weeks of regular deep relaxation practice, the “calm” centers of our brains start to become permanently more active.

Research conducted by Dr. Richard Davidson at the University of Wisconsin-Madison compared brain activity and immune response in two groups: “deep relaxation” vs. control group. The “deep relaxation” group showed increased immune response and increased activity in the left prefrontal cortex (that’s the part of the brain associated with a positive temperament). It appears that regular relaxation isn’t temporary – it actually helps the brain rewire.

“What we’ve found is that the [deep relaxation] trained mind, or brain, is physically different from the untrained one,” says Davidson.

Theory aside, the great news is that we know Guided Breathing works. Double-blind clinical trials have shown permanent blood pressure reductions of up to 36 points systolic and 20 points diastolic.

The technique used in the Breathtaking Nature Method is endorsed and/or taught by: Harvard Medical School, The Mayo Clinic, Johns Hopkins, Rush Presbyterian Hospital, The American Heart Association and other leading medical institutions.

To learn more about natural ways to lower your blood pressure without drugs, watch our FREE video “127 Secrets that the Drug Industry DON’T Want You to Know” at www.LowerBloodPressureDrugFree.com.

profession:  Naturopathic Health Product Designer
credentials:  Creator of The Breathtaking Nature Method, Whole Brain and Body, Calm Me For Life
specialties:  Digital Information Product Design
institutions:  Arizona State University
topic of interests:  Naturopathic Cures for High Blood Pressure, Mind-Body Balance

What to Know About High Blood Pressure

Before we examine the causes of high blood pressure, we must first understand what exactly it is. Put simply, the heart pumps blood through the arteries, arterioles and capillaries. This action supplies nutrients and oxygen to the organs in your body through blood flow then returns the blood to the heart through your veins. The blood pressure is the ease of blood flow through those pathways. If the vessels are dilated and wide open, then the blood flows through them easily but if they are contracted, it is more difficult for the blood to make its way through the narrow openings. This creates an increase in pressure, thus high blood pressure may occur.

Unfortunately for the majority of people with HBP problems, up to 95%, do not know the cause. This is typically referred to as primary hypertension. The remaining 5% fall into the secondary hypertension category. Secondary hypertension can be caused by kidney abnormalities, aortic abnormalities, and the narrowing of some arteries. Secondary hypertension is more easily diagnosed with a thorough physical examination and testing. Primary hypertension on the other hand can have many causes. The risk factors include:

Age: The risks increase as we age.

Sex: Of those diagnosed with high blood pressure, men are usually diagnosed the most up to age 45. After age 54, women have a greater likelihood of receiving an HBP diagnosis.

Ethnicity: African and Native Americans have extremely high rates of high blood pressure diagnosis.

Diet: Those who regularly ingest high levels of salt in their foods are more likely to develop high blood pressure.

Family History: Those who have direct family members with this problem are also more likely to develop primary hypertension.

Stress: People with high stress levels and anxiety are at higher risk for developing HBP. Lack of Physical Activity: Those with an inactive lifestyle are at risk for high blood pressure due to lack of exercise and a general tendency toward obesity.

Alcohol: More than two drinks per day can cause an increase in blood pressure.

These risk factors may occur separately or in any combination to cause hypertension.

While the cause of hypertension is often undetermined, there are lifestyle changes that can be made to decrease your risk for developing high blood pressure or reducing your current blood pressure. First and foremost, reduce sodium intake by cutting out salt in cooking. Also, be a label reader. Many prepackaged foods contain extremely high levels of sodium. Choose products low in sodium and high in nutrients like protein, calcium, magnesium and potassium. Also choose foods that are low in saturated fats and cholesterol. Maintaining a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables will boost your overall heart health by reducing both your blood pressure and your cholesterol.

In addition to an improved diet, increase your physical activity. Many people with high blood pressure are also obese due to poor diet choices and lack of exercise. It is important to get some form of exercise every day, whether it’s a walk around the block or a 10k run. Everyone has different comfort levels when it comes to exercising so don’t be discouraged. It will be hard at first but once you get into a routine, you will find there are many fun ways to get yourself moving. Also, keep in mind that, with exercise, weight management will come more naturally, thus improving your overall health and quality of life.

For those who cannot control their hypertension with these lifestyle changes, there are various prescription alternatives you may wish to consider with your physician. These include:

Vasodilators cause the muscles in the blood vessel walls to relax so the walls may widen, allowing for easier blood flow.

Beta Blockers reduce the heart rate in turn reducing the amount of blood pumping through blood vessels.

ACE Inhibitors reduce the body’s production of angiotensin II which causes blood vessels to constrict.

Because high blood pressure often has no definitive symptoms, it is important to have it checked regularly to reduce as much of your risk as possible. Left untreated, it can lead to serious damage to your heart, brain and other organs of the body often resulting in heart attack or stroke.

Jim Riggs is an authority in the fitness, nutrition and supplement industries. With more than twenty years of experience training everyone from soccer moms, to NFL Athletes, to Olympic gold medalists he has seen it all. Jim has a unique understanding, style and passion toward everything fitness. As a contributing writer for http://www.i-supplements.com Jim brings this uniqueness to the supplement world through no nonsense product review and hard hitting commentary.

How to Lower High Blood Pressure – Are There Natural High Blood Pressure Cures?

How to lower high blood pressure? Can it be done? Yes.

But don’t I need to take lots of pills? Well, you might do … but, there are also ways that you can lower  it  naturally. And not only will they help to reduce your hypertension, they are likely to help make you a healthier person overall.

Now it must be stressed, if you’re already taking high blood pressure (b.p.) medication then you should keep taking that until your doctor suggests that you no longer need to. Even if you’re feeling the bad side effects that many people do, you don’t want to throw away that medication just yet.

However, the ways of naturally lowering those b.p. numbers are useful whether you’re already taking medication or not. They will help your body and over time maybe you will be able to say goodbye to those pills.

Anyway, enough idle banter – just how do you lower your b.p. naturally?

Well, there’s 3 key things you should focus on.

The first involves exercising more. In particular, focussing on cardiovascular exercise – which is exercise that gets the heart pumping a little harder. This can be as simple as doing a bit more walking. Ideally, 30 mins of exercise today – cumulative – will be enough to make a big difference to your hypertension levels. However, if you are quite unfit and/or overweight and/or already taking high blood pressure medication, do consult with your doctor first.

The second change is diet. There’s actually a large range of natural supplements that can make a big difference to your body and your b.p.. And, of course, it’s absolutely essential that you reduce the amount of fast and/or fatty foods that you may be consuming.

Finally, get rid of that stress! Often in people with high blood pressure it’s the stresses in their life that finally put their body into a place where it shouldn’t be. By exercising and eating properly you will naturally help to reduce your stress levels, but you should also look into what other changes you can make to reduce your stress.

Hopefully you can see already that naturally lowering your blood pressure is not some crazy alternative lifestyle – it’s simple basic steps that can make a big difference. You can find out more about how to lower high blood pressure here – http://high-blood-pressure-cures.com

Power of Potassium to Lower Blood Pressure

Are you one of the millions that have diagnosed with high blood pressure? If you are then you know how serious it is and can be. How ever keep reading and you’ll discover a more natural way to help decrease your hypertension without the use of prescriptions. Be advised that if you are under a doctors care that you should consult with your doctor before making any major changes to your routine.

In case you did not know sodium holds water in body tissues. The average American diet provides far too much sodium than we need. Sodium intake, low potassium intake, heavy alcohol intake, unhealthy eating, and smoking. Although weight isn’t always a reliable indicator of whether or not you’ll have high blood pressure, the type of weight is.

Increased salt intake is directly linked to risk for high blood pressure (hypertension). This means that a high intake of it may increase risk for hbp. Sodium and potassium are two of the most important ions in maintaining the homeostatic equilibrium of the body fluids. A reduction in your salt intake also lowers blood pressure in the presence of any anti-hypertensive drug therapy. Although the effects on blood pressure are smaller in non-hypertensive individuals, the potential benefits of sodium reduction on hbp have substantial public health relevance.

Diets high in potassium are linked to a decreased risk of stroke in people with hypertension. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, the so-called DASH diet, was designed to help control pressure. The DASH diet can reduce your pressure and risk of heart disease through weight loss, reduced salt intake, moderation in drinking alcohol (for those who drink), and eating foods that are rich in this nutrient. Dietary sources are better tolerated than pharmacologic preparations, experts agree, although supplements are available over the counter or, in larger doses, by prescription may be necessary for those who take diuretic medications. Diuretics help the body lose excess water but also deplete its potassium supply.

Excesses of either sodium or magnesium may also cause loss of potassium. A deficiency can cause muscle weakness, intestinal problems (especially abdominal bloating), heart abnormalities, respiratory weakness, tingling sensations in the skin, and apathy. Excess weight and obesity are clearly associated with increased salt sensitivity.

Bananas, beans, tofu and potatoes are all rich sources of this much need vitamin. Many fruits and vegetables are also good sources of as well. Banana, which is a tropical fruit, has long been known as an excellent source for energy among endurance athletes. It comes in its natural sanitary peel-away package and is packed with approximately 120 calories of energy, containing sucrose, fructose and glucose. It is one of the best sources if you want a good daily supply. A medium banana will give you about 400 mg of potassium.

LA is an established free lance writer who enjoys writing articles to give consumers enough information to make informed decisions. Learn to control your blood pressure naturally visit LA’s site http://www.yourinforighthere.com right now!

Ways To Check Your Pulse Pressure

When you get to a certain age, blood pressure, and heart problems can become a concern.

Sometimes just finding out about simple things that you can observe and do to help keep yourself aware is useful.

Fluid systems in the body are notorious for the high level of complexity in their physics. The circulatory system is no different, and it is because of this that there are so many different factors that could affect a person’s blood pressure. The rate the heart pumps to the viscosity of the blood itself, blood pressure has influences from multiple factors in the body. These factors may, in turn, be influenced by outside factors such as diet, exercise, disease, or drugs. This is because of this that blood pressure has an even greater number of indirect influencers.

There are many different forms of pressure that you should get checked as well as your blood pressure to keep yourself in good health. If this is not taken care of, some of the problems that could be happening may not be found in time for them to be treated correctly. One type of pressure that could be checked is your pulse pressure. This is going to be the change in blood pressure during a single contraction of the heart. There is a way to find the pulse pressure of a person easily. Pulse pressure can be taken into account when there is a problem with your blood pressure. It is a good indicator to some different types of heart problems.

I have only just discovered how important pulse pressure is, it is time to talk about how to find out a person’s pulse pressure measurements. Normally, the pulse pressure is the systolic pressure minus the diastolic pressure. The following items can calculate it: stroke volume divided by compliance. Stroke volume is the volume of blood pumped out of a ventricle with each beat of the heart, as compliance is the standard regulation of beats. The resting pulse pressure in the average person is 40 mmHg and this could increase up to 100mmHg when a healthy adult is exercising. The numbers out of this range will show a possible health problem and you should talk to your doctor about it as soon as you can to avoid any kind of complications.

It is very rare to get a pulse pressure reading of less than 40mmHg. The chances are if you receive one that is really lower than the others, you have just done the calculations wrong. If the pulse pressure is low usually, it reflects a low stroke volume and this means that your heart is not pumping out the right amount of blood that it is supposed to. This could be due to a very serious problem like congestive heart disorder or shock.

If your pulse pressure is more than 40 mmHg, usually a reading between 60 and 80mmHg, there are few reasons that this may happen. This is an indicator of stiffness of the arteries, a leak in the aortic valve, and an extra path for the blood to go on from the arteries to the veins, hypothyroidism, or some kind of combination of these. It is something that should be discussed with your doctor if it is higher than average and of course, when you have lower pulse pressure than usual too.
Reviewing this I think you also need to be very good at maths!

Diane Shawe Author of Diet Dilema’s visit http://academy-of-vocational-and-professional-training.org/salon-business-advice/interesting-ebooks-a-ecourses/

Blood Pressure Machines

The following are the different types of the measurement for the blood pressure and the machines used. .

Arterial pressure

Arterial pressure is most commonly measured via a sphygmomanometer, which historically used the height of a column of mercury to reflect the circulating pressure. In the United States and the United Kingdom, BP values are reported in millimeters of mercury (mmHg), though aneroid and electronic devices do not use mercury. BP values are reported in SI units (MPa) in France.

 

For each heartbeat, BP varies between systolic and diastolic pressures. Systolic pressure is peak pressure in the arteries, which occurs near the end of the cardiac cycle when the ventricles are contracting. Diastolic pressure is minimum pressure in the arteries, which occurs near the beginning of the cardiac cycle when the ventricles are filled with blood. An example of normal measured values for a resting, healthy adult human is 120 mmHg systolic and 80 mmHg diastolic (written as 120/80 mmHg, and spoken [in the US] as “one-twenty over eighty”).

 

Arterial pressures are usually measured non-invasively, without penetrating skin or artery. Measuring pressure invasively, by penetrating the arterial wall to take the measurement, is much less common and usually restricted to a hospital setting.

 

Noninvasive measurement

 

The noninvasive auscultatory and oscillometric measurements are simpler and quicker than invasive measurements, require less expertise, have virtually no complications, are less unpleasant and less painful for the patient. However, noninvasive methods may yield somewhat lower accuracy and small systematic differences in numerical results. Noninvasive measurement methods are more commonly used for routine examinations and monitoring.

 

Palpation method

 

A minimum systolic value can be roughly estimated by palpation, most often used in emergency situations.[citation needed] Historically, students have been taught that palpation of a radial pulse indicates a minimum BP of 80 mmHg, a femoral pulse indicates at least 70 mmHg, and a carotid pulse indicates a minimum of 60 mmHg. However, at least one study indicated that this method often overestimates patients’ systolic BP.

 

Auscultatory method

 

The auscultatory method (from the Latin word for “listening”) uses a stethoscope and a sphygmomanometer. This comprises an inflatable (Riva-Rocci) cuff placed around the upper arm at roughly the same vertical height as the heart, attached to a mercury or aneroid manometer. The mercury manometer, considered the gold standard, measures the height of a column of mercury, giving an absolute result without need for calibration and, consequently, not subject to the errors and drift of calibration which affect other methods. The use of mercury manometers is often required in clinical trials and for the clinical measurement of hypertension in high-risk patients, such as pregnant women.

 

Oscillometric method

 

The oscillometric method was first demonstrated in 1876 and involves the observation of oscillations in the sphygmomanometer cuff pressure which are caused by the oscillations of blood flow, i.e., the pulse. The electronic version of this method is sometimes used in long-term measurements and general practice. It uses a sphygmomanometer cuff, like the auscultatory method, but with an electronic pressure sensor (transducer) to observe cuff pressure oscillations, electronics to automatically interpret them, and automatic inflation and deflation of the cuff. The pressure sensor should be calibrated periodically to maintain accuracy.

 

Home monitoring

 

Ambulatory blood pressure devices that take readings every half hour throughout the day and night have been used for identifying and mitigating measurement problems like white-coat hypertension. Except for sleep, home monitoring could be used for these purposes instead of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Home monitoring may be used to improve hypertension management and to monitor the effects of lifestyle changes and medication related to BP. Compared to ambulatory blood pressure measurements, home monitoring has been found to be an effective and lower cost alternative.

For more information on Blood Pressure Machines you can visit http://www.micglobal.co.uk/

This is Jon from Indian SEO, you can check Mic Global Website http://www.micglobal.co.uk/